Tips for Bringing Your Plants Outside for Summer & How to Acclimate Them Properly

Ahhh, the birds chirping and the sun shining, that steady warm weather is almost here! This means that when that constant warmer weather occurs, our tropical houseplants can soon enjoy the benefits of being outside for the season! 

What temperature is best to bring your houseplant outside?

The average houseplant likes a temperature of between 65-75 degrees. To be on the safe side, it is recommended that once it is constantly, at least 68 degrees at night, it is safe to bring your tropical houseplants outside for the summer! Yes, plants can tolerate as low as 50 degrees, but keep in mind that “tolerating” does not mean it is safe to place your plant outside in that temperature. And of course, anything lower than that can have detrimental effects on your plants. 

Watch out for the random temperature spikes too! Some days we have a random outlier, and it is a gorgeous 80 degrees, but falls back again that night/the following day. This is why is it recommended that when it is consistently at least 68 degrees at night and definitely during the day, it is time to bring your plant outside. 

The constant warmer temperature is important because if it was a warm outlier day and then we need to bring the plant back inside because it returned to cold, that moving around of the plant is not appreciated by your plant friend.

Plants love consistency. Some plant may even drop leaves because of the constant changing. For this reason, only move your plant outside when the warm weather is constant, and your plant can safely stay out there for the season. 

Now that you are bringing your plants outside, it is still important to monitor for pests.

Plants that are in soil, are like a little piece of Earth that we are taking home with us. That soil is its own little eco-system with healthy bacteria and the potential of being host to some unwanted critters. When we bring our plants outside to enjoy the benefits of sun, rainwater, humidity, and wind…the potential for critters to call it “home” also increases. Now, though some critters are inevitable (talking to you there, gnats), some we need to minimize their potential to call our plants “home” as they can cause damage (the dreaded T word, thrips).

So how do we do this? Well lucky for us, Explorganics owner Shannon, has figured out the perfect ratio of neem oil to beneficial essential oils, to help us not only prevent but treat pests using Explorganics Leaf Care Spray. Have this magic tool handy and make sure to clean your plant consistently to prevent/treat critters and you will have yourself a very happy plant friend! 

Once a plant goes outside, if it needs to come inside for whatever reason, keep separate from the rest of your indoor plants.

If a plant has been outside, when you bring it indoors, always keep separate from the rest of your plants as it has the potential of having pests. No matter if it was there for just an afternoon, it just takes a minute or so for a little critter to land and lay eggs. Some are hard to see so to be on the safe side, keep that plant separate. This is important because below you will find the acclimating schedule and it calls for your plant to be outside for a period of time for the first few days and then brought back inside. In this interchange, make sure to keep that plant in its own spot not close to the rest of your plant family just for precaution. 

How to properly acclimate your plants to being outside:

Acclimating is very important!! When acclimating your plant that have been inside all winter to the outside, it takes a little bit of work. The elements outside are drastically different to our indoors and it can shock the plant if just brought outside and left there for the season. For this reason, we suggest bringing your plants in towards the evening/night in the beginning. Watch out for signs of distress during the acclimating period. It can mean that your particular plant may need a little longer of an acclimating period so lessen the duration of being outside and increase in even smaller time frames.

Below is a guide on how to acclimate your plants for the first 7 days.

Day 1: Bring your plant outside during the morning/afternoon. When choosing a spot to place your plant outside, make sure it is a bright indirect light and no direct sun. Also make sure to choose your new spot indoors for the plant at night separate from the rest of your plants. Once you choose both spots, place your plant in those spots every day. This is so that the plant has consistency during an inconsistent time, because as stated earlier, plants don’t like to be moved around so much. Example: keep plant outside from 7:00am – 12:00pm

Day 2: The next morning, put it back outside at the same time and place it in the same spot that it was in. Increase its stay outside by and hour or so. Remember to bring it in again during the evening. Example: keep plant outside from 7:00am – 2:00pm

Day 3: The next morning, put it back outside at the same time and place it in the same spot that it was in. Increase its stay outside by and hour or so. Remember to bring it in again during the evening. Example: keep plant outside from 7:00am – 4:00pm

Day 4: The next morning, put it back outside at the same time and place it in the same spot that it was in. Increase its stay outside by and hour or so. Remember to bring it in again during the evening. Example: keep plant outside from 7:00am – 6:00pm

Day 5: The next morning, put it back outside at the same time and place it in the same spot that it was in. Increase its stay outside by and hour or so. Remember to bring it in again during the evening. Example: keep plant outside from 7:00am – 7:00pm

Day 6: The next morning, put it back outside at the same time and place it in the same spot that it was in. Increase its stay outside by and hour or so. Remember to bring it in again during the evening. Example: keep plant outside from 7:00am – 8:00pm

Day 7: Keep your plant outside and do not bring it back in at night. You have completed the acclimation period!! Congratulations!!

Keep in mind, once plants are outside, they will require substantially more water than when they were indoors. Therefore, make sure you check their watering needs much more frequently. It is highly recommended to invest in a moisture meter to guide you and give you more confidence in the new watering schedule. 

Make sure you’re monitoring the those very hot, dry days during the warmer months. 

Tropical plants love humidity and some need extra moisture during those super hot days. As always, let your plant tell you how it is doing. If you notice some crispy edges, or burn spots, you may have it in too much sun. It is always recommended for our tropical plants to have a handy mister with you during those hot days to provide much needed moisture to their leaves. If you have access to a hose, that works too!


How to care for plants once they’re outside:

Once your plants are outside the most important rule of thumb is to watch your plant for signs of what it needs. Plants are quite vocal with what they need.

  1. Checking their watering needs will be the most important!
  2. Check for signs of too much sun, or even too little sun. 
  3. Check for signs of distress being outside, and your plant simply not being happy. It is important to address that issue quickly! Only keep the plant outside if it is showing signs if flourishing. 
  4. Keep up with that Leaf Care Spray leaf cleaning, to avoid in the long run a resilient critter from calling your plant “home.” 


The spring/summer is the perfect time to fertilize your plant as it is their growing period! This being said, it is NOT recommended to fertilize your plant until after the acclimation period and once it has been outside for a good two/three weeks and it is thriving. If your plant is showing any sign of distress outside, to add fertilizer during this period can harm your plant.

Remember, the general guideline for fertilizing a plant is doing so only to a plant that is thriving and growing new leaves. It is also important to use a gentle organic fertilizer, as your plant has just gone through a change and using a strong chemical fertilizer can burn roots/plant. We highly recommend Joyful Dirt fertilizer! Most importantly they are organic, and safe for our children, pets, and Earth! *It is never recommended for us, our children or pets to eat plants, however, some plants are non-toxic and using non-toxic fertilizer helps keep the plant generally non-toxic.

So, there you have it! How to acclimate your indoor plant to become an outside plant for the spring/summer! An outdoor plant can have many benefits such as better lighting, access to the best water (rainwater!), humidity, and wind! I hope with this guide, you have a better understanding of just how to accomplish the task, but never forget you can always reach out if you have any further questions! 

Now, let’s enjoy that beautiful warm weather, with our human and plant friends alike!


follow me on insta

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s